Cee’s B&W Photo Challenge: light

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Thought I should try to take part in more photography challenges. here is my entry to Cee’s B&W weekly challenge. The topic this week is ‘light’. What better way to start it than with shots taken from the ‘Diwali’ – the festival of lights! I had written about the festival in an earlier post, for those interested click here. In frame are shots of terracotta oil lamps. the second picture is a terracotta oil lamp with the motif of the two Hindu deities associated with the festival: the elephant-headed Ganesh and Lakhsmi the goddess of wealth.

©ingallei

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Circle

Circle
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My first post for the Weekly Photo Challenge. I was not sure if the post is supposed to be a single photograph or not, but I just saw pen and paper blog and thought of posting more than one.

The photo challenge, for me, is to capture the circle that is the sun – ironic as the challenge says, because the sun shines bright and the circle is not always clearly visible to the eye and to capture it through photography which – for me is so much about light and composition. the first photograph stood out for me but then it seems to miss a point of reference.

These pictures were taken on a rather cloudy smoggy day of an approaching winter evening. In frame is a setting sun whose amber tones seem highlighted by the smog.

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A hardy little plant

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Portulaca Grandiflora

Another one from my Mashoodpur visit. I found this hardy little plant nonchalantly flowering among the stones and bricks of the wall between two houses in this little urban village of Delhi.

I am not able to recall its name in my native language but i used to have this in my flower-pot sometime back. It is quite a perfect kind of plant to be suspended in those hanging pots. It has bigger flower – bigger than the one in this picture which is in fact smaller than that of an oxalis bloom. The ones in my flower spot had similarly given miniature versions of the bloom just like this one but its parent plant had bigger blooms. I wonder if it has to do with soil.

According to the flowers of India, this is the portulaca grandiflora also called the moss rose. I always thought portulaca was another plant (apparently i had mistaken it for purslane). the interesting thing is how this flower is quite the time-keeper: in Bangladesh it is known as time-phool (time flower),  in Hindi it is called nau-baje or 9 o’clock as it flowers around this time of the day and in Vietnam it is called 10 O’clock.

It must be quite a punctual flower to be given such a time-specific name! I wonder what it would have been called before the clock was invented!

©Ingallei

In the urban village of Mashoodpur, underneath the Babool tree

In the village of Mashoodpur

In the village of Mashoodpur, Delhi

Some days back, I accompanied a friend  on a visit to Mashoodpur, an urban village in Delhi. I happened upon this big babool (sc. vachellia nilotica) tree with lovely yellow flowers. I caught sight of many children playing around in the ground partially shaded by the tree. A barber had also opened shop in the open area – his shop consisted of a chair, a mirror and his tools. He was busy with his customer. The scene reminded me of a lifestyle that I no longer associate with Delhi.

I took a couple of pictures of the tree and wondered if I should take a picture of the scene in front of me or if people would mind me doing so. That was when a couple of children intervened to take the decision for me. They happily asked me to take their picture.

‘To paradise, the Arabs say, Satan could never find the way until the peacock led him in’

…. and that makes me wonder why we are so in love with beauty and yet are so suspicious about it.

In flight:

In flight: evening rendezvous continues; entries from My Peafowl Diaries ©Ingallei

The dancing peacock: another from my Peafowl Diary

pre-monsoon teasers: Dancing Peacock - entries from My Peafowl Dairies

Pre-monsoon teasers: Dancing Peacock – entries from My Peafowl Dairies    

They sure love posing for the camera standing tall (and higher level than me) on the opposite building as the evening sun bathes the red bricks of the community center. That day he came as usual around evening tea time and decided to give a teaser of the thousand eyes in his tail. In Hindu mythology, the peacock is said to have gained these thousand eyes from Indra, the king of Swargalok who reigns in heaven.

©Ingallei

My Peafowl Diary: The dancing peacock

and that is performing for an audience

A peacock among peahens: .. and that is performing for an audience: entries from My Peafowl Diary @Ingallei

Another view from my balcony. The community centre continues to be a hangout for these beautiful birds. they are beautiful no doubt but they sound horrible!! The male of the species sounds worse – almost like braying or a keyboard with the wrong chords, but don’t they simply look amazing!